The GAA have announced the revenue for year ending 2019. It is a record revenue with a total of 73.9 million euro for 2019, this is a 16% increase on the previous year. In 2017 for instance the GAA revenue came in at over 60 million euro. 

RTE report that the majority of that revenue generated was down to the growth in gate receipts. In 2018 it was 29.6 million to 36.1 million in 2019. This was largely down to bigger attendances at games and an increase in prices of match tickets. Furthermore, gate receipts accounted for nearly half of the revenue for 2019.

Tom Ryan the director general of the GAA released his annual report on Tuesday which also looked at Pairc Ui Chaoimh and Casement Park. He stated that the total cost of Pairc Ui Chaoimh would be 96 million euro. However, the long term debt would be around 20 million, while he also revealed Cork County Board received 10 million euro as a loan from Croke Park and 21.5 million of bank loans.

In terms of Casement Park, Ryan said there is “positive signs”, however, the proposed costs have likely increased owing to the Northern Ireland 2010/11 budget approval date. Several other projects are also in the pipeline according to the report. These include a state of the art development of two full sized pitches, a GAA clubhouse and dressing rooms directly across from Croke Park which is property of Clonliffe College. The report states that this project is something similar to Abbotstown.

The report also shows that revenue from the Allianz League was up 10%, while their was a 20% increase in season ticket holders. Coaching and development funding increased to 13.5 million euro which was a 22% increase from the previous year. 7.9 million was given to club and county infrastructure in 2019, while 4 million in grants was also given out. One stark finding the report found was the spending of preparation costs for inter county teams. This took a 12% increase in 2019 which the report labeled “unsustainable”.

In conclusion, the GAA have made millions in 2019. It’s now up to them to consider given the so called weaker county sides more funding. They should pump more money into coaching into these small counties . However, instead of giving the bigger stronger counties a bigger slice of the pie in terms of funding. Players in Leitrim, Antrim, Clare for example train just as hard as the 5 time All-Ireland winners in Dublin. How can these counties improve without the funding they so desperately need? That is the question I would put to the GAA top brass.

 

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