Horse racing fans have much to still look forward to with these five meets

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As one of only a few constants during the pandemic, horse racing is back to its usual events – without spectators of course. But, just which five horse racing meets should people be getting excited about?

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes

One of Ascot’s most cherished races, the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes takes place on Saturday 25 July. One of the most prestigious Group 1 races of the British flat season, the Stakes is traditionally the first occasion when the most promising three-year-olds of the season’s Classic generation take on their elders for the first time over 1m 4f. You can check out the horse racing predictions in advance with John Gosden’s Enable the one to beat.

Glorious Goodwood

With five days of Glorious Goodwood between Tuesday 28 July and Saturday 1 August, horse racing fans are in for some fantastic events with the £1 million Qatar Sussex Stakes just one of many throwing up seriously good opportunities to wager. The five-day festival is one of the most attractive race meetings of the flat-racing season with the Sussex countryside providing the perfect backdrop to exciting races. 

Yorkshire Ebor Festival

What would have been the best attended festival at York Racecourse in 2020, the Ebor is likely to be held behind closed doors, commencing August 19 and ending on the 22nd. In 2019, the Ebor offered £1 million in prize money with there likely to be an increase in punters due to such a target in 2020. The final major flat turf face in the summer season, the Ebor is always good fun.

Kentucky Derby

Previously scheduled for May 2, the Kentucky Derby has been moved to September 5 as the second-part of the US Triple Crown changes dates for only the second time in its history. The first came during World War II in 1945 when it was moved to June 9 instead of May 3. Pushed back four months, the Derby will give horse owners and trainers better preparation time and allow guests to more easily change their travels – if, of course, spectators are allowed to watch live in Louisville.

Preakness Stakes

With the Kentucky Derby moving to September, the Preakness Stakes has changed dates too, scheduled for October 3. The date for the Stakes was necessary to be held within one month of the Derby so Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore now has its biggest race in the fall rather than the spring. Now the third jewel in the Triple Crown, Preakness is usually held in either May or June, but has made the change due to the coronavirus outbreak.

 

 

 

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